Dalsnuten!

Yesterday, I finally had a chance to flee the urban scenery of Stavanger, Norway.  While the city is a great place to spend some time, those of you who’ve kept up with my website for awhile know that I much prefer those places with fewer people and more nature.  For me, photographing a beautiful landscape is the ultimate therapy for relieving work and travel-related stress.  Norway is in no short supply of beautiful scenery to aid in that relief!

Without a car here, I’m at the mercy of public transportation or very expensive taxi services.  Fortunately, a friend of mine who lives here was compassionate to the site of my longing stares off to the horizon and he and his girlfriend picked me up after work so they could show me around.  They took me to a place called Dalsnuten, which is just outside of Sandes, Norway.  This convenient location offered trails up the backside of a mountain that overlooks Stavanger and the surrounding towns and fjords.  The hike started out relatively flat and easy but as soon as you get beyond sight of the car, you’re faced with some pretty grueling uphill stretches.  Lots of rock climbing, slipping, sweating and heavy breathing.  Totally worth it!

 

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

When we reached the top of a little mound on the way up the mountain, we took a moment so I could grab this quick portrait of my friends. It’s the least I could do to show my appreciation for their generosity of time and gas.

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

Back on the trail, we continued across several wet, marshy areas where these stones provided us a less muddy crossing.

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

This is a view from the top of the mountain.  A warm, gentle breeze carried the smell of sweet grass and, even from as high up as we were, in the valley below you could here the echo of bleating sheep.   Sublime!

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

 

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

On the trek back down the mountain, we made a detour across a field of thick grass and moss to check out an old stone wall off in the distance.  What we didn’t realize as we set out across the field was that it was actually a marsh hiding beneath all the grass.

Hiker’s Tip:  While stepping around like a cat in the snow, I find making grunting noises and other random vocalizations helps keep your socks dry.

We did manage to get across the field and to the stone wall.  Well worth the trouble for these next few shots.

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

 

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

 

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

 

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

As we neared the end of the trail back to the car, I got this final shot of the setting sun and these wood planks laid down across some wet areas.

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

After the hike, we cruised over to the nearby town of Ganddal to get some dinner.  On a walk around a beautiful lake in town, I saw these interesting flowers growing beside an old railroad.

Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)
Sony A7RmkII w/ Minolta MD 35-70mm f/3.5 Macro (3rd Gen)

 

Tom and Charlotte,

Thank you so much for the wonderful evening and your hospitality in showing me an unforgettable evening at Dalsnuten.

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3 thoughts on “Dalsnuten!

  1. Grunting noises totally help keep your socks dry. 😉 You’re hilarious… I love you. The pictures are amazing! I’m so glad you’ve gotten to see such beauty!!

    Like

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